Tuesday, January 5, 2021

Chowalloor Shiva Temple, Guruvayur, Kerala

Chowalloor Shiva Temple, Guruvayur, Kerala

Chowalloor Shiva Temple is a Hindu Temple dedicated to Lord Shiva, located at Chowalloor, near Guruvayur in Thrissur District in Kerala, India. This Temple is considered as one of the 108 Shiva Temples created by Lord Parasurama. It is also considered as one among the five Shiva temples around Guruvayur. Only Hindus are allowed inside the temple premises. Daily three poojas are conducted for Lord Shiva.



Legends

For brief details, please refer below link;

https://hindutemples-india.blogspot.com/2021/01/chowalloor-shiva-temple-guruvayur-legends.html

The Temple

The temple is facing west and covers an area of about 4 acres. There are no towers on the temple walls. The temple does not have flag mast. The main Balikallu in Balikalpura is about 10 feet tall. Hence, the Shiva lingam cannot be seen from outside. Presiding Deity is housed in the sanctum in the form of Shiva Lingam and is facing west. Lord is a Swayambhu Moorthy. His consort, Parvathy is also housed in the sanctum facing east. The sanctum is in round shape and is of two tiers.


There is a shrine of Subrahmanya Swamy, facing east on the north-west side of the temple premises. There is a shrine of Navagrahas, in the north east corner of the temple complex.  Stone idols of Saptha Matrikas in the form of Bimbas, made of Krishnasila can be seen in the temple premises. There are shrines of Ganesha, Ayyappan and Anjaneya in the temple premises.


Festivals

12 Days festival in the month of Ohanu, Shivaratri and Ashtami Rohini are the major festivals of the temple.

Prayers

Pattum Thaliyum Charthal offering to Parvathy is performed to grant marital bliss for the unmarried and also for better marital relationships.

Contact

Chowalloor Shiva Temple,

Kandanassery P.O., Guruvayur,

Thrissur, Kerala – 680 102

Phone: +91 4885 238 166

Email: chowalloorsivakshethram@gmail.com

Connectivity

The temple is located at about 4 Kms from Guruvayur Bus Stand, 4 Kms from Guruvayur Railway Station, 5 Kms from Guruvayur, 5 Kms from Choondal, 7 Kms from Kunnamkulam, 24 Kms from Thrissur and 77 Kms from Cochin Airport. The temple is situated on Guruvayur – Choondal Route.

Location

Chowalloor Shiva Temple, Guruvayur – Legends

Chowalloor Shiva Temple, Guruvayur – Legends

108 Shiva Temples of Kerala:

According to Hindu mythology, Lord Parasurama created the land between Gokarna and Kanyakumari. Parasurama the sixth avatar of Maha Vishnu, he was youngest son of sage Jamadagni and Renuka. It is said that Kerala was reclaimed from the ocean using his axe for donating to Brahmins after killing of King Kartavirya Arjuna and other Kshatriyas. He split this land in to 64 villages (64 gramas). Out of these 64 villages, 32 villages are in between Perumpuzha and Gokarnam and the spoken language was Tulu.

The remaining 32 villages were in Malayalam speaking area between Perumpuzha and Kanyakumari. According legends, after donating the land to Brahmins108 Maha Shiva Lingam and Durga Idols were installed in these 64 villages. These 108 Shiva Temples are mentioned in the Shivala Stotram and song is written in Malayalam language. Of the 108 Siva Temples, 105 temples are situated in Kerala state, 2 temples in Karnataka and 1 in Kanyakumari District of Tamil Nadu.

Among these temples, the Lord Shiva of Gokarnam Mahabaleswara Temple in the north and Goddess Kumari of Kanyakumari temple in the south were considered as the protectors of Kerala. The first temple created by Parasurama was the Thrissur Vadakkunnathan Temple and the last one was the Thrikkariyoor Mahadeva Temple. This Temple is considered as one of the 108 Shiva Temples created by Lord Parasurama.

Equivalent to Vadakkunnathan:

Lord Siva, the deity of Thrissur Sree Vadakkunnathan Temple is said to have manifested himself on an umbrella carried by one of his ardent devotees, a pious old Namboothiri from Chowalloor Mazhavannoor Mana (lllam of Namboothiri), who used to walk all the way to Thrissur to have daily darshan of the Lord. When his devotee became too old to walk and worship him regularly, the Lord is said to have accompanied him to his native home in Chowalloor. Later a temple was constructed at the very place where the Lord appeared to his devotee and started regular pooja (Nithya Pooja).

Thirumandhamkunnu Temple, Angadipuram, Kerala

Thirumandhamkunnu Temple, Angadipuram, Kerala

Thirumandhamkunnu Temple is a Hindu Temple dedicated to Lord Shiva, located at Angadipuram in Malappuram District in Kerala, India. The Thirumandhamkunnu Temple is situated on top of 60 feet high hillock. Presiding Deity of this Temple is Lord Shiva. However, famous deity is Bhadrakali, locally known as Thirumandhamkunnilamma. She is considered the elder sister of Kodungallur Bhagavathy. Angadipuram was the capital of Valluvanad Kings. The Temple is believed to be built by ancient Chera Kings. This Temple is considered as one of the 108 Shiva Temples created by Lord Parasurama. It is one of the most important Hindu pilgrimage centres in Kerala. 





Legends

For brief details, please refer below link;

https://hindutemples-india.blogspot.com/2021/01/thirumandhamkunnu-temple-angadipuram-legends.html

The Temple

For brief details, please refer below link;

https://hindutemples-india.blogspot.com/2021/01/thirumandhamkunnu-temple-angadipuram-temple.html

Temple Opening Time

The Temple remains open from 04:30 AM to 11:00 AM and 04:00 PM to 08:00 PM on all days.

Pooja Timings

Venue

Name of Pooja

Timings

Mathrusala

Usha Pooja

6 AM ( Before Dawn )

Pantheeradi Pooja

9.30 AM

Ucha Pooja

11.30 AM

Thirinju Pantheeradi Pooja

4.30 PM

Athazha Pooja (After Sunset)

8.00 PM

Sree Moola Sthanam

Morning Pooja

Before 7 AM after Usha Pooja at Mathrusala

Ucha Pooja

10.30 AM

Athazha Pooja (After Sunset)

7.30 PM

Festivals

Thirumandhamkunnu Pooram (March – April), the annual festival of the temple is an 11-day-long celebration, a major festival in the district of Malappuram. Mangalya Pooja, Kalampattu, Kootticha Procession, Rigveda Laksharchana, Prasadam Ottu, Valiyakandam Nadeel, Attanga Eru, Njaralthu Sangeetholsavam, Chanthattam and Nira are other festivals celebrated here. Several tantric poojas are also performed in the temple throughout the year.

Contact

Thirumandhamkunnu Bhagavathy Temple,

Angadipuram – 679 321

Malappuram, Kerala

Phone: +91 4933 258 820 / 258 555

Fax: +91 4933 253 820

Connectivity

The Temple is located at about 500 meters from Angadipuram Temple Bus Stop, 2 Kms from Angadipuram Railway Station, 20 Kms from Malappuram, 41 Kms from Kozhikode Airport and 62 Kms from Palakkad. The Temple is situated Kozhikode – Palakkad Highway. Regular Buses are available from Kozhikode, Palakkad and Malappuram.

Location | Photos

Thirumandhamkunnu Temple, Angadipuram – Legends

Thirumandhamkunnu Temple, Angadipuram – Legends

Thirumandhamkunnu:

King Mandhata of Surya dynasty ruled his kingdom for a long period. He then gave away the kingdom to his successors and chose to meditate on Lord Shiva and attain the Shiva's feet at the end. Lord Shiva was pleased with his penance appeared before the King Mandhata and offered him any boon at Mount Kailash. The king prayed to the lord for an idol to worship till his death. Lord Shiva gave him the most holy Shiva Lingam, used to be worshipped by Mother Parvati. King Mandhata carried the Shiva Lingam on his head and started his journey towards south. He reached the hill now known as Thirumandhamkunnu in Kerala.

The place was abounded with natural beauty and attracted the King. King Mandhata felt the Lingam was heavy and hence the Lingam on ground. Shiva Lingam got struck into the ground and was difficult to move.  Meanwhile, Lord Shiva had gifted the Shiva Lingam to the king when his consort Parvati was away for her bath. She did not find the Lingam, when she turned up for worship of the Shiva Lingam. She got upset and enquired about the Lingam. She came to know that Lord Shiva gifted the Lingam to the King Mandhata. She wanted the Lingam as she was much attached to it.

Lord Shiva told her that he had no objection to get the Lingam back from the King. Mother Parvati ordered Bhadrakali and Bhoodha Ganas to get back the Shiva Lingam from the King. Bhadrakali reached the northern slope of Thirumandha hill with the army of Bhooda Ganas. The brightness emitted by the Shiva Lingam installed by king Mandhata was so great that it dazzled the eyes of Bhadrakali and the Bhooda Ganas. They were unable to climb the hills. Hence, they started throwing up the weapons from the foot of the hill. Sages accompanying King Mandhata were unarmed but tried to defend themselves with whatever things they had.

Finally, they plucked Attanga nuts from their creeper plants, which were available in plenty and threw them at the enemy. Due to the grace of Lord Shiva and divine power of Mandhata, the nuts got changed into arrows instantly. Bhadrakali and her army of Bhootha Ganas fought for fifteen days. The age-old custom of Attangayeru on first of Thulam (the Malayalam month) on the new moon day of the same month in the forenoon before pantheerady pooja refers to the legendary fight between Mandhadha and Kali. Sensing the defeat, Mahamaya took her Viswaroopa. The sages felt down senseless on seeing her Viswaroopa.

When she reached the hilltop, even Mandhadha was helpless on seeing her Viswaroopa form. He embraced the Shiva Linga, but Kali tried to capture the Lingam by force. Linga got split into in this struggle. A Jyothi arose from the Shiva Lingam. Trimurthy (Brahma, Vishnu & Shiva) along with Mother Parvathy arose from the Jyothi. Mother Parvathy told Mandhadha that the idol was close to her and also informed she did not wish to take the Lingam away from him against the wishes of Lord Shiva. Also, she informed that she could not the bear the separation from the Lingam. Further, she stated that she would enter the Lingam and remain here forever.

As Kali came here first, Parvathy instructed to install Kali near her facing north. Parvathy entered into the Lingam in the Sreemoolasthanam and disappeared. The Shiva Lingam here is still in split condition. Its position is below the Peedam and Prabhamandalam and can be seen only during the abhisheka before the Usha Pooja. As ordered by Parvathy, Bhadrakali with Saptha Matrikas, Veerabhadra and Ganapati were installed facing north. This place is called as Mathrusala. When Parvathy appeared, infant Ganapathy was also with her. This infant Ganapathy had also been installed at Sreemoolasthanam.

King Mandhadha spent several years at Thirumandhamkunnu in meditation. When he knew it was time for him to leave this material world, he started thinking of entrusting the management of temple to able person for its maintenance. Two Brahmins visited Mandhadha and he felt that they were the right persons. Mandhadha gave them a Grandha containing instructions on the performance of poojas and entrusted the management of the shrine to them. He then retired to the forest nearby now known as Kukshipparakkad and attained the feet of Lord Shiva. Devotees go around this forest, pick a leaf from the plants and keep it in hair with at most reverence. This area is still a protected forest.

One Brahmin cleared the forest around the idol and hence came to be known as Kattillamuttam. The other Brahmin prepared pavilion for Prathishtai and came to be known as Panthalakode. The Thantri of Thirumandhamkunnu temple is still a descendant from either of these families. The Nair karyasthan who was with them was given the title Chathathumarar and made the blower of holy conch in the temple. The Namboodiris informed the news to Vadakkara Swaroopam Raja, subordinate chieftain of Valluvanadu Raja, holding the title Mannarmala Raja. He immediately rushed to the spot.

Seeing the over lord of the hill, the goddess got up and paid homage to him. This humility of Devi made the raja blink in shame and he prayed to the goddess to see him as a son. He then presented an elephant to the goddess and worshipped her from its rear, standing in its shadow. His descendants also followed the same practice. Even now direct darshan of Thirumandhamkunnu Bhagavathy is not permissible to Mannarmala Raja.

The first Valluvaraja who took over the control of the temple entrusted its upkeep and maintenance to the local feudal lords Ettuveetil Achans. Sreemoolasthanam does not have a roof, which is an evidence of it having been a Kavu. The painting on the walls of the Mathrusala throws light on this legend. In the Devaprasana conducted in 1959, it was observed that an idol of Mandhadha should be installed here.

108 Shiva Temples of Kerala:

According to Hindu mythology, Lord Parasurama created the land between Gokarna and Kanyakumari. Parasurama the sixth avatar of Maha Vishnu, he was youngest son of sage Jamadagni and Renuka. It is said that Kerala was reclaimed from the ocean using his axe for donating to Brahmins after killing of King Kartavirya Arjuna and other Kshatriyas. He split this land in to 64 villages (64 gramas). Out of these 64 villages, 32 villages are in between Perumpuzha and Gokarnam and the spoken language was Tulu.

The remaining 32 villages were in Malayalam speaking area between Perumpuzha and Kanyakumari. According legends, after donating the land to Brahmins108 Maha Shiva Lingam and Durga Idols were installed in these 64 villages. These 108 Shiva Temples are mentioned in the Shivala Stotram and song is written in Malayalam language. Of the 108 Siva Temples, 105 temples are situated in Kerala state, 2 temples in Karnataka and 1 in Kanyakumari District of Tamil Nadu.

Among these temples, the Lord Shiva of Gokarnam Mahabaleswara Temple in the north and Goddess Kumari of Kanyakumari temple in the south were considered as the protectors of Kerala. The first temple created by Parasurama was the Thrissur Vadakkunnathan Temple and the last one was the Thrikkariyoor Mahadeva Temple. This Temple is considered as one of the 108 Shiva Temples created by Lord Parasurama.

Thirumandhamkunnu Temple, Angadipuram – The Temple

Thirumandhamkunnu Temple, Angadipuram – The Temple

The Thirumandhamkunnu Temple is situated on top of 60 feet high hillock. The hill top provides an enchanting view of the surroundings. Presiding Deity of this Temple is Lord Shiva. However, famous deity is Bhadrakali, locally known as Thirumandhamkunnilamma and Ganesha. The Shiva Linga housed in the sanctum and is facing east. It is in split condition confirming to the Mandhadha legend. It can be seen only during the abhisheka before the Usha Pooja. Mother Parvathy is facing west.


The Sanctum does not have a roof, which is an evidence of it having been a Kavu. Hence, it was necessary to have two darshan openings one to the east and the other to west. The family descendants of Valluva Konathiri do not generally open the one on the west except for darshan. On either side of the doorway, there are two openings through which other worshippers can have darshan of the deity. But in recent past, the restrictions have been eased. After each pooja, the door is kept open for some time for darshan of the deity by devotees.


The temple deity, Thirumandhamkunnil Amma, was considered as official goddess of the kings of Valluvanad, the local feudal kings ruled the area in the Middle Ages. She is housed in north facing shrine along with Saptha Matrikas, Veerabhadra and Ganapati were installed facing north. This Shrine is called as Mathrusala. The Idol of Thirumandhamkunnilamma in Mathrusala is of Daru.  A number of Bhadrakali temples in Kerala have Daru idols, but one at Thirumandhamkunnu excels them all.


The idol of this temple is almost identical with that at Kodungallur, except that the Angadipuram idol is taller. Due to this, the Angadipuram Thirumandhamkunnu Bhagavathy is considered the elder sister of Kodungallur Bhagavathy. The other difference is that no animal sacrifices are done at the Angadipuram Temple. The famous marriage oblation (Mangalya Puja) is performed to Lord Ganesha. Devotees believe Mangalya puja will remove obstacles for one's marriage.


There is an idol of Rurujit (one who conquered Ruru, the Asura) in Mathrusala. The idol is about six feet high, in a sitting posture with the left leg bent up to the lap and the right one freely hanging down. The painting on the walls of the Mathrusala depicts the temple legend. These paintings along with the wall paintings of Suchindram, Pundarikkapuram, Vaikom and Guruvayur were executed in 1944. Nagas and Brahmarakshas can also be found in the Temple premises.


There is also an idol of Child Ganapathy at the foot the age-old Peepal tree standing on the northern side of the temple. The Nair warriors (called Chavers, literally martyrs) of Valluvanad king set out from this temple to Thirunavaya, to participate in the famous Mamankam festival. A memorial structure called the Chaver Thara (platform of the martyrs) can be found in front of the main entrance of the Thirumandhamkunnu Temple.


Mundayur Mahadeva Temple, Anjur, Kerala

Mundayur Mahadeva Temple, Anjur, Kerala

Mundayur Mahadeva Temple  is a Hindu Temple dedicated to Lord Shiva, located at Anjur in Thrissur District in Kerala, India. This Temple is considered as one of the 108 Shiva Temples created by Lord Parasurama. The place was previously called Mundayur, now called Mundur.


Legends

For brief details, please refer below link;

https://hindutemples-india.blogspot.com/2021/01/mundayur-mahadeva-temple-anjur-legends.html

The Temple

This is an east facing temple. Presiding Deity is called as Mundayurappan and is facing east. He is housed in the sanctum in the form of Lingam. There are shrines for Ganapathy, Sastha and Bhagavathi in the Temple premises.

Festivals

The annual festival of Mundayur Mahadeva Temple celebrates for Laksharchana in the month of March–April (Malayalam month: Meenam). Shivarathri festival is the other important one celebrated by the temple every year in the month of Feb-March (Malayalam month: Kumbham).

Connectivity

The Temple is located at about 1 Km from Mundur Bus Stop, 2 Kms from Anjur, 8 Kms from Mulangunnathukavu Railway Station, 11 Kms from Thrissur, 12 Kms from Thrissur Railway Station, 13 Kms from Kunnamkulam, 18 Kms from Guruvayur and 64 Kms from Cochin Airport. The Temple is situated in Kunnamkulam – Thrissur Bus route. 

Location

Mundayur Mahadeva Temple, Anjur – Legends

Mundayur Mahadeva Temple, Anjur – Legends

108 Shiva Temples of Kerala:

According to Hindu mythology, Lord Parasurama created the land between Gokarna and Kanyakumari. Parasurama the sixth avatar of Maha Vishnu, he was youngest son of sage Jamadagni and Renuka. It is said that Kerala was reclaimed from the ocean using his axe for donating to Brahmins after killing of King Kartavirya Arjuna and other Kshatriyas. He split this land in to 64 villages (64 gramas). Out of these 64 villages, 32 villages are in between Perumpuzha and Gokarnam and the spoken language was Tulu.

The remaining 32 villages were in Malayalam speaking area between Perumpuzha and Kanyakumari. According legends, after donating the land to Brahmins108 Maha Shiva Lingam and Durga Idols were installed in these 64 villages. These 108 Shiva Temples are mentioned in the Shivala Stotram and song is written in Malayalam language. Of the 108 Siva Temples, 105 temples are situated in Kerala state, 2 temples in Karnataka and 1 in Kanyakumari District of Tamil Nadu.

Among these temples, the Lord Shiva of Gokarnam Mahabaleswara Temple in the north and Goddess Kumari of Kanyakumari temple in the south were considered as the protectors of Kerala. The first temple created by Parasurama was the Thrissur Vadakkunnathan Temple and the last one was the Thrikkariyoor Mahadeva Temple. This Temple is considered as one of the 108 Shiva Temples created by Lord Parasurama.

Lord Shiva of Mundayur saved Kozhikode Zamorin's army:

Kozhikode Zamorin's army meditated on the Lord Shiva of Mundayur Temple and went out to battle. It was because such a practice was presumed that Lord Shiva of Mundayur saved them.